Guitar practice randomiser
By Neil Downing

This page generates a random key so that when you are practising guitar you don't get bogged down using the same scales every time you play.

The suggested use is:

  1. Write down the notes in the key (don't scroll down yet!)
  2. Write down the chords in the key
  3. Write down the relative key (i.e. if you have a major, what's the relative minor, or vice versa?)
  4. Now scroll down to check if you were right
  5. Find the root chord (try to find a chord position lowest down the fretboard)
  6. Find the nearest pentatonic shape to the chord you've just found
  7. Play through the five pentatonic scales, starting with the one you've just found

 

Random key: A major
(A random key is generated every time you load this page. To change it, refresh the page.)

↓ Scroll down to see the notes and chords in the selected key ↓
Notes in the key of A major:
A, B, C#, D, E, F#, G#

Chords in the key of A major:
I II III IV V VI VII
A Bm C#m D E F#m G#°

12-bar blues progression in A:
A7A7A7A7
D7D7A7A7
E7D7A7A7

Relative key: F# minor

Disclaimer: As a guitarist, I have a stereotypical disregard for music theory and, as such, I have no idea when I should use the terms "sharp" or "flat" (e.g. whether I should call a note C# or D♭), so I have used "sharp" in all cases here.